Philadelphia: The Birthplace of America

So over the weekend I had a chance to go visit Philadelphia, my first actual trip to America in a long time. I’ve been to America a bunch of times, but recently the trips have mostly been simple day trip border crossings to go check out a Trader Joe’s or something so this was a unique trip in the sense that it was an actual trip.

Which is also neat too, since as far as I can remember, I think this was the first time I’ve actually flown into America as an actual destination. Every other time I’ve flown there before was for a layover or something so those don’t really count.

The main purpose of the trip was to attend my cousin’s wedding. But since it was a long weekend for us in Canada, that meant we had some extra time to actually do some sightseeing and walk around. To be honest, I didn’t have many expectations for the trip going in. America isn’t typically a place that I’m too interested in visiting.

The very first time I’ve attended a wedding that was hosted in a museum.

I’ve technically been to Philly before, but that was over a decade ago so I don’t remember too much about it. So I decided that the best way to handle this trip was to just kinda go with the flow and check it out like I’ve never been before.

Now, typically when you think of America, I don’t think you’d normally use the words “historic” to describe it. Oddly enough, Philly was pretty historic. It’s pretty unique in the sense that America was pretty much founded there like 250 years ago. The Founding Fathers got together one day and signed a piece of paper that led to the creation of what is now the most powerful country in the world.

Not bad for a day’s work right?

Independence Hall, a place where some dudes a while back signed some papers.

But pretty much as a result of that, a lot of the older elements in the city were preserved since they are a direct link to America’s history. This means that you have buildings that are over one or two hundred years old, which in European or Asian terms is practically nothing, but for North America that’s pretty old.

One of my favourite aspects of cities in other continents is that they typically have an interesting mix of historical, cultural, and modern architecture. North America doesn’t normally have that so I was pleasantly surprised by Philly’s downtown core since it actually had old stuff in it. I have to say I am a fan of seeing the contrast between an old architectural style and modern skyscrapers.

The main tourist attraction in Philly would be the Independence Mall, which is a large park which contains the Independence Hall, the building where the Declaration of Independence was signed. The building itself isn’t extremely exciting, but the significance of the place is not lost on you. Between all the information kiosks and the statues hanging around, you are very aware of the events that once took place where you are standing.

A statue of John Barry, the “Father of the American Navy”.

Aside from that, if you check out a map of Philly, you’d see that around city hall there are four parks that make up a larger rectangle with city hall in the middle. The four corner squares are Franklin Square, Washington Square, Rittenhouse Square, and Logan Square. These, alongside city hall, were designated as public areas hundreds of years ago and still exist today.

The interesting thing about them is that when I went, they were all slightly different with a different feel and atmosphere. Franklin Square had some random Chinese Lantern Festival going on which was weird because it’s definitely not time for any Chinese Lantern Festivals, and so the atmosphere there was kinda.. cheesy and fake?

Washington Square is nearby the Independence Hall and carried a more somber tone. The square contained the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which represents the fallen soldiers during the Revolutionary War. I have a great respect for soldiers, especially those who died fighting for their country, so these monuments are kinda neat. This was especially interesting since I visited another Tomb of the Unknown Soldier last year in Moscow, but obviously they were focused on different soldiers.

Freedom, what a word.

Rittenhouse Square was the least exciting square in my opinion. This is probably also due to the fact that it was pouring rain during my walk to there and so not only was that an annoyance, but the park was also fairly wet when I got there. It felt more like a typically European park with some paths and fountains, but it was wet and I was tired so I didn’t stay long.

Logan Square was honestly more of a circle than a square, but it contained a giant fountain in the middle and it was pretty nice. They had a lot of signs saying no swimming but there were a ton of people swimming in the fountain. I guess America is truly the land of the free.

City hall, in the center square, is probably the best square. But at the same time it’s totally cheating since it has city hall there so it’s not a true public square. Regardless, the city hall looks absolutely beautiful. You have this giant intricate building and right in front of it there’s a few grassy areas, small water spouts, and some chairs for sitting. The atmosphere was very relaxing and wonderful.

Despite being a bit squished, I’m pretty happy with this panorama.

It was a long day of walking around and so I just kinda sat there for a bit to take it all in. It was really nice. I definitely felt some of the similar ambiance that you’d feel in some parks in Europe, with the people chilling in the grass and the big fancy building in the background. It would’ve been the perfect place for a cold drink and a book or something.

Considering how nice city hall looked and how modern the subway entrances there looked, it was a pretty big surprise for me when I actually got down to the train platforms and saw just how uh, different things were down there. Not only was it run down and old, but the subway service was pretty garbage and people were literally smoking on the platform. That genuinely surprised me a bit since city hall looked so nice, but it was a pretty stark reminder that Philly is in North America, the continent with terrible public transit.

And of course, you can’t talk about Philly without talking about Philly Cheese Steaks. They’re delicious so I made it a goal to have some legit cheese steaks during my trip. I asked a friend of mine for recommendations and he pointed me to a restaurant that he said was good and so we went and tried it. It didn’t look super great but it tasted pretty ok. Would probably go back.

A non-photogenic, but pretty good, cheese steak.

Overall, Philadelphia was pretty ok. As far as North American cities go, it was actually pretty interesting. I liked how there was a good mix of modern, historic, and open spaces in the city and it was definitely very walkable. Might be a bit of a random trip to go there just to visit the city, but it would definitely be a list of places I’d recommend as part of a road trip or something though.